Local photographers wanted by Wikipedia

Wikipedia and their sponsor, Archaeology Scotland and Wikimedia UK, are calling all professional and amateur photographers to take part in this year's 'Wiki Loves Monuments' photography competition as part of Scottish Archaeology Month.
Wikipedia and their sponsor, Archaeology Scotland and Wikimedia UK, are calling all professional and amateur photographers to take part in this year's 'Wiki Loves Monuments' photography competition as part of Scottish Archaeology Month.

Wikipedia is seeking the help of local photographers to expand world knowledge of historical monuments.

Wikipedia and their sponsor, Archaeology Scotland and Wikimedia UK, are calling all professional and amateur photographers to take part in this year’s ‘Wiki Loves Monuments’ photography competition as part of Scottish Archaeology Month.

Contestants are asked to submit high quality images of listed buildings and scheduled monuments around the UK for a chance to win some amazing prizes. To enter, visit the Wiki loves monuments website (www.wikilovesmonuments.org.uk) and upload your photos using the interactive map.

Scotland has a rich heritage which deserves a global audience. As an international photography competition, Wiki Loves Monuments helps to make openly-licensed images available worldwide through Wikimedia Commons, the repository which provides most of the images for Wikipedia - which is available in nearly 300 languages. Last year’s winner was The Derelict West Pier at Brighton, by Mathew Hoser.

A Scottish image came second in the overall UK competition, Glenfinnan Viaduct at Loch Shiel photographed by Paul StÜmke.

In the Borders area there are a number of buildings and monuments that are yet to be photographed including Mary Queen of Scot’s House in Jedburgh, Thomson’s Monument in Kelso, and Wallace’s Statue in Dryburgh.

Aside from being great fun, Wiki Loves Monuments is a way of capturing a snapshot of the nation’s cultural heritage for future generations.

Scottish Archaeology Month runs from the end of August to the beginning of October, alongside Doors Open Days as part of European Heritage Days.

To learn more, visit www.archaeologyscotland.org.uk.