Uncovering Hume Castle’s hidden history

Fallago Environment Fund chairman, Gareth Baird (left) joins Douglas Tweedie from the Hume Castle Preservation Trust at Hume Castle near Greenlaw in the Scottish Borders to mark the announcement of a �32,890 grant.
Fallago Environment Fund chairman, Gareth Baird (left) joins Douglas Tweedie from the Hume Castle Preservation Trust at Hume Castle near Greenlaw in the Scottish Borders to mark the announcement of a �32,890 grant.

A project to uncover more about the history and heritage of Hume Castle has been given a £32,890 boost from a Fallago Environment Fund grant.

Hume Castle Preservation Trust will research Hume Castle, village and kirk yard, near Greenlaw - a settlement that dates from medieval times and from which the Home/Hume clan takes its name.

The castle was destroyed on the orders of Oliver Cromwell in 1651 and lay in ruins until it was restored as a folly by Hugh Hume, Earl of Marchmont in 1790, with further restoration taking place in the 20th century.

Much of Hume has been hidden from history but recent drone photography revealed a potentially significant medieval landscape beneath the grass, which could help our understanding of medieval life in Scotland.

The Fallago Environment Fund grant will contribute towards surveys of the buildings, monuments and landscape of the area, archaeological excavations and production of displays and interpretation materials to explain the area’s rich history and any new discoveries.

Members of the local community will receive training in technical drawing, photography and archaeological recording and excavation to help unlock the secrets of the castle’s past.

Gospatric Home, chair of Hume Castle Preservation Trust, said; “Hume Castle has a beautiful and dramatic location and can be seen for miles, but while it is a familiar and imposing sight, an in-depth understanding of the castle and its landscape has been sadly lacking. We now know that there is the potential to uncover much about its medieval past and to use this to educate and engage both the local community and visitors from further afield. We’re extremely excited about the discoveries that may lie ahead and are grateful to the Fallago Environment Fund for helping us with a project that will provide a better understanding of the region’s past and the influence of the Homes on the local landscape.”

Five other Fallago Environment Fund grants went to: Stobo Village Hall (£20,000); Thirlestane Castle (£15,000); Waterloo Monument, Peniel Haugh (£12,500); Keith House, Coldstream (£8000); Kelso Folk Festival (£1500).