Roxburghe Estate’s conservation status

The Duke of Roxburghe, SLE chairman David Johnstone and Roxburgh Estates factor Roddy Jackson at the Border Union Show.
The Duke of Roxburghe, SLE chairman David Johnstone and Roxburgh Estates factor Roddy Jackson at the Border Union Show.

Roxburghe Estates has been given national accreditation for its outstanding work on wildlife, habitat and conservation management.

Wildlife Estates Scotland accreditation was presented to the Duke of Roxburghe and estate factor Roddy Jackson by Scottish Land & Estates chairman David Johnstone at the Border Union Show, Kelso.

Covering around 52,000 acres, Roxburghe Estates encompasses land from grassy slopes of the Cheviot Hills and the heather clad moorland of the Lammermuirs to the fertile land of the Tweed valley.

Land management activity includes farming, forestry and sporting and the award was made following a rigorous accreditation process, which demonstrates that the estate is observing best practice in its management regime.

Recent conservation projects at Roxburghe include a five-year programme to enhance biodiversity and habitat on moorland at Byrecleugh and Rawburn in the Lammermuirs, benefiting birds such as curlew, lapwing, snipe and black grouse. The estate has also been developing a project to restore grey partridge numbers on lowground at Roxburgh, with 43 pairs in 2012 building to 127 pairs by 2017.

David Johnstone, chairman of Scottish Land & Estates, said: “It is only right that the excellent game, wildlife and habitat management that takes place on our farms and estates is recognised publicly.

“Owners and managers of WES accredited estates and farms should be proud of the work they have done, often over many years, to enhance their land for wildlife and encourage the many species that now live there.”

Roddy Jackson, factor at Roxburghe Estates, said: “The award of WES accreditation is significant testament to the hard work of all the staff across the estate. The conservation and habitat projects we’ve been working on have been hugely beneficial to both the estate and to local wildlife and a scheme such as WES helps us document what we have been doing.”