Commonwealth Games display

The Hosts and Championship Commonwealth Games touring exhibition will on display in Coldstream from May 21.
The Hosts and Championship Commonwealth Games touring exhibition will on display in Coldstream from May 21.

An exhibition celebrating Scotland’s relationship with the Commonwealth Games will be on display at Coldstream Museum next month.

Drawn from the Commonwealth Games Scotland Archive, held by the University of Stirling, ‘Hosts and Champions: Scotland in the Commonwealth Games’ celebrates over 80 years of participation and achievement by Scotland, from its origin as the British Empire Games in Hamilton, Canada, in 1930, through to Glasgow 2014.

The exhibition is currently on show at Hawick Museum until May 12 and will move on to Coldstream Museum from May 21.

The exhibition includes photographs, designs, clothing, papers and artefacts which evoke a rich story of Scotland’s involvement in the Games, including as hosts in 1970, 1986 and 2014.

Scottish athletes are currently competing in the Gold Coast Games in Australia and the exhibition will continue to celebrate Scotland’s long contribution to the competition.

The exhibition started life as part of a cultural programme to accompany the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games. Its tour of Scotland began in 2015 and it has been seen by thousands of people.

Richard White, assistant curator at Hawick Museum, said: “It is a great honour to be hosting this exhibition.

“The exhibition has never been to the Borders, a region with a strong sport tradition and several recent medallists.

“We hope local communities will enjoy and reminisce on some of Scotland’s great sporting achievements at the Games, as both hosts and champions.”

Michael Cavanagh, former chair of Commonwealth Games Scotland, added: “The Commonwealth Games Scotland Archive is a fantastic collection of artefacts which highlight how the Games have grown and trace Scotland’s involvement from the very beginning.

“We are delighted these exhibitions will bring the archive to life and allow people to share in what makes the Commonwealth Games so special.”