Not enough Words to do Runners justice

Frazer Smiles (Joe Stargardt) and David Robson (Julius Reuter) pioneers of telegraphy and news reporting technology during Robert Wilkinsons 'Words in the Wires'
Frazer Smiles (Joe Stargardt) and David Robson (Julius Reuter) pioneers of telegraphy and news reporting technology during Robert Wilkinsons 'Words in the Wires'

Tremendously moving, extremely evocative, finely acted - Tideline Runners struck gold for a third time last week with ‘The Words in the Wires’.

The pen of Robert Wilkinson produced yet another piece of theatre that wasn’t just good in the realm of local productions but is easily one of the best shows I’ve seen all year and I’ve no doubt it would stand its ground amongst many a professional play.

The pairing of David Robson and Frazer Smiles was once again theatrical poetry in motion as they took their demanding roles of Julius Reuter and best friend Joseph Stargardt by the scruff of the neck and showed exactly why leading roles are now common place for them.

Much like their partnership in last year’s ‘Blood Brothers’ the characters of the two men behind Reuters news agency enjoyed some joyously happy moments but also ensured some extremely sad ones.

The final scene between Julius and Joseph, with the former faced with the realisation he had lost the friend he once knew forever, was particularly heart wrenching and one of the most believable and touching scenes I’ve witnessed in a long time.

Praise too needs to be heaped on the young shoulders of Bee Dinardo. Like her cast mates, she has made her mark on local theatre in the past year. She shone in ‘Blood Brothers’ and the role of the young Ida Reuter provided her with a platform for another gutsy performance.

Not content with writing and directing the show, Robert Wilkinson was at his eccentric best as the older Reuter, with Bee’s mum Trudy Whitehead making a welcome return to the stage as the more mature Ida.

Tideline Runners has taken some of the area’s finest actors and propelled them to the next level.

There were fabulous turns once again from Gary Robson and Tamsin Davidson as Henry and Emily Temple; Mark Vevers was absolutely hilarious as both Sigismund Englander and Arthur Peabody as was Jim Herbert as Vernon Magnus.

Matthew Jenkins, David Simpson, Paddy-Jo Flanigan and Trudy Morrison were again impressive pieces to the jigsaw and Slink Jadranko and Dan Flanagan made a fine first impression.

This review may sound incredibly gushy but with a engaging script that conjured all sorts of emotions, a fantastic cast and poignant use of multimedia there truly wasn’t a fault to be found.