Artist/author Alasdair Gray is Scottish national treasure

Alasdair Gray author living in Glasgow's west end.
Alasdair Gray author living in Glasgow's west end.

Zembla Gallery, Hawick, are delighted to announce an exhibition of works by Alasdair Gray, entitled ‘A Retrospective Selection’.

The exhibition will chart Gray’s visual development from his early years at The Glasgow School of Art, through his landscape period before exploring his love of murals (many of Gray’s most famous murals will be represented).

Several rarely seen portrait commissions, together with personal paintings of his friends and family, will be displayed as well as from works from 1953-2012 including paintings, prints and drawings that span the artist’s full career.

Born in Glasgow in 1934 into a working-class family, Alasdair Gray went on to become one of Scotland’s most multi-talented artists. Over the course of the last half century, he has come to be known as a groundbreaking novelist, publishing 18 books (his first being the highly acclaimed ‘Lanark’ (1981) and winning the Whitbread and Guardian book prizes. In addition he has also written many plays, for the stage, television and radio.

Also a respected academic and poet, Gray was Professor of Creative Writing at Glasgow University from 2001-2003.

He has exhibited widely across Scotland, particularly in his home city of Glasgow, where he has also undertaken several mural commissions for many of the city’s churches. One of his longest-lasting murals can be seen in the Ubiquitous Chip restaurant in Glasgow’ West End.

This exhibition gives Borders audiences the chance to become acquainted with one of Scotland’s most versatile polymats or, for those already familiar with Gray’s work, to re-discover the delights of his seemingly endless talent.

Viewing is by appointment only at Zembla Gallery, Stirches Road, Hawick, from February 13 to March 11.

There will also be some rare signed posters and books for sale. For more information email brianrobertson7011@gmail.com or call 07843625232.