A nice day for a Duns Players wedding

Duns players and DDAOS join forces for Reivers week in staging Tracey's Wedding, the third play in a mini-trilogy written by Bob Noble'Anne Hartley and Kate Leister steal the show as gossiping Margaret and Elsie
Duns players and DDAOS join forces for Reivers week in staging Tracey's Wedding, the third play in a mini-trilogy written by Bob Noble'Anne Hartley and Kate Leister steal the show as gossiping Margaret and Elsie

After a real wedding party had taken place there the night before, Duns Players revelled in the aftermath of some theatrical nuptials at the Volunteer Hall on Sunday.

In the last few years a Players Reiver’s Week production has become just as synonymous with the event as red and black rosette and once again the amateur group did the town proud.

Duns Operatic Society got the evening off to a fitting start with some wedding themed songs from the musicals including ‘Marry The Man Today’ from ‘Guys & Dolls’ and ‘Get Me To The Church On Time’ from ‘My Fair Lady’.

The scene was now set for the evening’s main event- ‘Tracey’s Wedding’.

Having witnessed her hen do last year audiences were wondering if writer and director Bob Noble would give the Duns lassie a happy ending.

But before any conclusion could be drawn to the plot there was plenty of scandal to devour.

The protagonists of much of the tittle tattle were resident gossip mongers Elsie and Margaret played by Kate Lester and Anne Hartley.

The script gave the pair the perfect spring board to entertain with plenty of Duns dialect and local references to entertain the audience- Duns Rugby Club, Hawthorn Bank to name a few.

The couple at the heart of the action, Tracey and Wull were brought to life by Lyn Gray and DC, a duo who I’m surprised have time to breath given the fact they’ve taken on all sorts of roles of late.

They were once again were impressive as was Matthew Taylor as best man Chris, a role which brought him back onto the stage after being behind the scenes as the director of the Players ‘Vicar of Dibley’ in May.

One of Duns very own ‘Calendar Girls’, Emma Taylor was also on fine form as bold as brass Bridget, who was determined to stir up some trouble.

But try as she might, Brisget failed to make the same impact as Peter Lerpiniere’s character, Peter Bo Chont, who rather than being Tracey’s uncle was in fact her dad.

With a question mark also hanging over the paternity of Wull things had the potential to get a bit ‘Eastenders’ but fortunately there weren’t that many skeletons in Peter’s closet.

If ‘Tracey’s Wedding’ was a stick of rock it would have Duns Players right through it. It was funny, endearing, witty and the camaraderie between the cast encapsulated the Reiver’s Week spirit.