Coldstream sack Galloway after just three weeks in job

Liz Redpath of Farm to Freeze in Wooler presents a cheque to Mike Galloway of SHAK, a dog rescue home with 'King' the dog.
Liz Redpath of Farm to Freeze in Wooler presents a cheque to Mike Galloway of SHAK, a dog rescue home with 'King' the dog.

COLDSTREAM are looking for yet another new manager following the dismissal of former Hearts and Celtic midfielder Mike Galloway after just 23 days in the post.

The 45-year-old was appointed manager of the East of Scotland First Division club on April 26, but the committee decided unanimously to relieve him of his duties following an emergency meeting at Home Park last Thursday night. According to a statement issued by the club, the committee was unhappy about “a number of decisions and demands” made by Galloway during his short tenure.

The statement read: “Coldstream Football Club has parted company with manager Mike Galloway with immediate effect. The decision was made at an emergency committee meeting at which concern was raised about a number of the manager’s decisions and demands since his appointment on April 26. The club would like to thank Mr Galloway for his short time as manager and is now seeking to recruit a new manager for season 2011/12. The club will be making no further comment at this time.”

Galloway’s appointment came about after previous manager Mark Lamb told the club in mid-March of his intention to leave at the end of the season. Coldstream advertised the post a month later and then appointed Galloway on April 26 as manager for season 2011/12. But with three games left to play and a new manager installed for the following season, Lamb and assistant Jim Rae decided to leave immediately in order to give Galloway the chance to assess the current squad of mainly Edinburgh-based players before the new campaign.

With Lamb and Rae having left and senior player Phil Johnson asked to step in as interim assistant, Galloway met the squad for the first time ahead of the home match against runaway leaders and eventual champions Gretna and watched the Streamers slump to a 5-0 defeat.

After witnessing the team’s heaviest defeat of the year, Galloway made clear his intention to rebuild over the summer by recruiting a new squad of players from the Borders, Berwick and north Northumberland and to train locally.

With this announcement and his decision two games from the end of the season to immediately switch training from Edinburgh to Coldstream and release players from a threadbare squad of just 13, Galloway quickly lost the confidence of the dressingroom and became involved in a series of disputes with the committee.

Johnson was put in caretaker charge for the final two games of the season while Galloway was told to scout for new players. That led to a loss of trust between Galloway and Johnson and when the new manager’s financial demands led to another dispute with the club’s committee, matters quickly came to a head after the season was concluded and an emergency meeting was called.

Coldstream were understood to favour a replacement for Lamb who could reverse the departure of so many local players and improve results following a disappointing season in which the team finished a lowly ninth in the table. While Galloway, who enjoyed a successful season in charge of Wooler in the North Northumberland League, appeared to tick all these boxes, his methods, decision-making and demands turned committee members against him. Galloway, on the other hand, feels he has been treated unfairly.

Coldstream acting chairman Allan Wilson said: “A decision has been made and we want to draw a line under this episode and move on. The priority for the club is to appoint a new manager and begin preparations for the new season.”