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Your picture of the week

This week’s photo was sent in by Fay Waddell of Eyemouth.

Fay explained: “My husband and I had rowed from Eyemouth to St Abbs a few weeks ago and stopped for some refreshment. I took this photo, concentrating on getting a good shot of our clinker dinghy, without realising how unusual the photo would be! The following day the dinghy was the star in a photo shoot by a team of German fashion photographers, one of whom was in St Abbs and saw the dinghy the day I took the photo.”

Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Alex McSorley from St Boswells took this close up photograph of the powerful sculpture which overlooks the sea at Eyemouth. The sculpture is a memorial to the 189 fishermen who lost their lives in the fishing disaster of October 1881. Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

Your picture of the Week

Alex McSorley from St Boswells took this close up photograph of the powerful sculpture which overlooks the sea at Eyemouth. The sculpture is a memorial to the 189 fishermen who lost their lives in the fishing disaster of October 1881.

Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Dave Holland sent us this photo of a small herd of deer that popped into the Eyemouth Golf Club for supper! Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

Your picture of the Week

Dave Holland sent us this photo of a small herd of deer which he said “popped into the Eyemouth Golf Club for supper!”

Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley captured this spring image of Fogo Parish Church. Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

Your picture of the Week

Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley captured this spring image of Fogo Parish Church.

Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Eyemouth High School student Jodie Martin-Marshall sent us this view taken during the evening at Little Millbank, Eyemouth. Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

Your picture of the Week

Eyemouth High School student Jodie Martin-Marshall sent us this view taken during the evening at Little Millbank, Eyemouth.

Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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The River Tweed running through Coldstream.

Your picture of the Week

Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley sent us this view of anglers on the River Tweed at Coldstream.

Please email your photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Duns park, Polish and British War Memorials with seasonal flowers in the forground in April.

Your picture of the Week

Nature appears to be currently – albeit temporarily – upstaging the British and Polish war memorials in Duns Park with seasonal flowers. Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley supplied this image.

Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Coldingham Sands view

Your picture of the Week

Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley provided this image of Coldingham Bay. Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Taken by Louise Renton from Duns at work on Crystal Rig Wind Farm near Cranshaws

Your picture of the Week

Louise Renton, from Duns, took this image of deer near Crystal Rig wind farm, Cranshaws.

Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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John McGuffie took this photo of the Northern Lights from Cornhill looking north over the Merse with Duns in the distance. Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

Your picture of the Week

John McGuffie took this photo of the Northern Lights from Cornhill looking north over the Merse with Duns in the distance.

Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Dave Johnston took this view of the snow covered Cheviots from the main road west of Coldstream.

Your picture of the Week

Dave Johnston took this view of the snow-covered Cheviots from the main road west of Coldstream.

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Taken on 23rd February in Storm Doris at Crichness near Cranshaws by Louise Renton from Duns

Your picture of the Week

Louise Renton, from Duns, captured the effects of Storm Doris at Crichness, near Cranshaws, last Thursday.

Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Dunbar harbour

Your picture of the Week

Dunbar harbour, pictured by Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley.

Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk.

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Ellemford Bridge, Berwickshire.

Your picture of the Week

This image of Ellemford Bridge, built in 1886 by the Berwickshire Road Trustees, was supplied by Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley.

Please email photographic contributions, along with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Swinton Kirk.

Your picture of the Week

Borders freelance photographer Stuart Cobley captured this image of Swinton Kirk, parts of which date back to the 11th century.

Its bell is famous for being rung as a death knell after the Battle of Flodden in 1513. Please email photographic contributions, along with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Old Thirlstane Castle by Lauder  highlighted by the strong afternoon sunlight.

Your picture of the Week

Old Thirlstane Castle, near Lauder, is highlighted by strong afternoon sunlight in this Curtis Welsh photograph. Please email pictures, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Sunrise at Crichness near Cranshaws taken by Louise Renton from Duns.

Your picture of the Week

Sunrise at Crichness, near Cranshaws in the foothills of the Lammermuirs, taken by Louise Renton from Duns.

Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Artificial (street lamps) and astronomical (star trails) lighting combine to illuminate Chirnside.

Your picture of the Week

Artificial and astronomical lighting, in the form of street lamps and star trails, combine to illuminate Chirnside. The image was captured by villager Elizabeth Berry. Please email photographic contributions, with a brief caption, to

berwickshirenews@jpress.co.uk

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Letters to the editor

Taxpayers and the tapestry

Alex Orr (letters, December 22) lists the freebies available to Scots through public spending that is 20% higher than in England.

He omits the crucial fact that those freebies and that spending are paid for by the English taxpayer. The nationalists always omit the essential truth that Scotland is kept afloat by the British Treasury and the Bank of England.

If Scotland was an independent country it would have a fiscal deficit of £14.5bn – worse even than Greece. Break the Union and you break Scotland as a going concern.

Scotland has been in the red every year since devolution – even when oil revenues were high. Now that they have plummeted, things have gone from bad to worse.

Scotland’s deficit of 9.5% is well over the 3% required for EU membership which the SNP bosses crave. To kneel at the door of Brussels, income tax would have to rise from 20p to 39p, or VAT would have to increase to 40%. Alternatively, savage spending cuts would have to be implemented, sweeping away all the freebies, slashing the NHS budget by 80%, stopping all spending on roads and railways, and giving up on even the pretence of armed forces.

Mind you, even without the ball and chain of independence, it will be a struggle to maintain our freebies. And yet still the magic money tree is shaken for ever more superfluous projects – such as the Great Tapestry of Scotland building in Galashiels.

The deeper Scotland gets into debt the more we seem to spend on extras while vital services are cut.

Writing in The Times on December 21, Alistair Moffat, a “co-chairman” of the tapestry project, states that viewers of this nationalist artwork are “often moved to tears”. Taxpayers will be so moved when the final itemised bill is presented to them.

Thanks to the local press we know Scottish Borders Council (SBC) has already spent £520,000 on this nationalist project, will cough up another £3.5m and maybe more, while Holyrood will spend £2.5m. The total cost will be in excess of £7m.

To be fair, the project is expected to return £50,000 a year which means the tapestry building will be paid back in 140 years.

However, as SBC’s Rob Dickson has warned, “failure to meet visitor targets or manage costs will require ongoing subsidy”.

William Loneskie

Oxton

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Aussie on the trail of Borders family history

I am seeking information about my family - and there are several Lintons and Robertsons sprinkled among them.

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