VIDEO: record numbers at Flodden Day rideout

Flodden Day 2013 saw a record number of horses and riders - 464 - follow Coldstream Pipe Band and a contingent of Coldstream Guards to Coldstream Bridge, the cavalcade then making its way three miles onto English soil to Flodden Field as King James IV’s men did 500 years ago.

In the town’s ancient Market Square, the Lord Lieutenant of Berwickshire was present for the day’s first ceremony - the 15th Earl of Home charging Coldstream, Grant Campbell, to carry the Home colours to the scene of the 1513 Battle of Flodden and return with them unsullied.

The cavalcade is waved off by lined streets in Coldstream as it makes its way through the town before the ride out during Flodden Day at Coldstream civic week

The cavalcade is waved off by lined streets in Coldstream as it makes its way through the town before the ride out during Flodden Day at Coldstream civic week

The Coldstreamer was also charged to cut a sod of earth from Branxton Hill and to return with it to Coldstream for a ceremony on the Tweed Green.

This commemorates the actions of Abbess Hopringle and the nuns from Coldstream Abbey who brought the bodies of soldiers of rank and birth back onto Scottish soil to be given Christian burial on consecrated ground.

Borderers on horses and ponies of all shapes and sizes crossed the Coldstream Bridge into England, with onlookers lining the streets to cheer them on.

After making a loop across newly cut fields outside Cornhill, the cavalcade turned back to approach Branxton.

First the horses were given the chance of a gallop on the picturesque grounds of Pallinsburn House, where a small group of spectators gathered to see them run along an avenue of grand old oak trees.

The main part of the cavalcade then rode on to Branxton, past the church where the wounded and dead from the battle were taken. Meanwhile the Coldstreamer had ridden ahead to lay a wreath at the foot of the stone cross which forms the Flodden Monument.

Presenting Coldstream chairman Jim Leifer concluded the day of ceremonies with the laying of thistles at the monument.

The thistles are laid in memory of the borderland families that were decimated at Flodden.

A solo piper played in a procession of dignitaries from both sides of the border, including the civic party of Berwick as guests.

Michael Moore, MP and Secretary of State for Scotland, laid a thistle in the name of “the people of Scotland”.