DCSIMG

Change to school week will help if staff are cut

Primary and secondary pupils will get a half day under the proposal to move to an asymmetric week

Primary and secondary pupils will get a half day under the proposal to move to an asymmetric week

If teacher numbers are cut, a move to a four-and-a-half day school week will help, the council’s director of education has revealed.

Announcing a consultation on the proposed move to an asymmetric week in all Borders schools from August, Glenn Rodger said: “As teachers’ salaries make up the majority of the schools’ budgets, a managed reduction in teacher numbers is the most viable route to achieving savings targets.

“A move to an asymmetric week will assist schools to plan and deliver teaching and learning in the most efficient way and potentially in future with fewer teachers.

“However, there are a number of other benefits to the change. There is already a consensus amongst our primary and secondary head teachers that an asymmetric week would allow for greater collaboration between all teachers and enhance joint planning around key aspects of Curriculum for Excellence.”

A series of public meetings will be held across the area to discuss the proposal, with the consultation closing on February 28.

Pupils, parents, staff and stakeholders are being encouraged to make their views known, with an online survey set up on the SBC website.

Under the system, both primary and secondary pupils would spend four-and-a-half days in school each week, but with no reduction in the total classroom time for pupils.

For full details of the public meetings, see the SBC website.

 

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