DCSIMG

Byelaws to curb public drinking get the go ahead

Coldingham Community Council is concerned that drinking alcohol in public may put others off visiting Coldingham

Coldingham Community Council is concerned that drinking alcohol in public may put others off visiting Coldingham

Stopping people drinking alcohol in public places in certain part of the Borders will be tried once again after a failed attempt in 2007 to introduce public drinking bye-laws.

There is no great support for such byelaws - Scottish Borders Council getting a response from only 0.1 per cent of the region’s adult population when it recently consulted on the matter - which prompted council leader David Parker to move that councillors take no action and drop the matter.

“It’s unsafe for us to take forward this proposal at this time,” he said. “The evidence is not there and the case hasn’t been made.”

However, fellow executive member and East Berwickshire councillor Michael Cook disagreed.

“When it comes to the communities they know what they want,” said Councillor Cook.

“Some communities don’t support this but Eyemouth Community Council is very much in favour of it. It’s a much needed tool in this community.”

Supporting Coldingham’s wish to also have bye-laws prohibiting drinking in designated public places Councillor Cook added: “It’s based on the knowledge and experience they have in their own communities. Communities should be allowed to choose their own path.”

Councillor Jim Fullarton spoke about the “loutish behaviour” of some people visiting Coldingham.

“Why are we afraid?” asked Councillor Fullarton. “It’s simply another tool to control the use of alcohol.”

Councillor Parker’s proposal to drop the introduction of byelaws restricting drinking in public places was defeated - 13 votes to 14. Bids to have Jedburgh and Galashiels removed from the list of communities covered also failed.

Byelaws prohibiting the consumption of alcohol in designated places - Eyemouth, Coldingham, Galashiels, Hawick, Jedburgh and Newtown St Boswells - will be drawn up followed by a statutory consultation period and once confirmed by the Scottish Government they will become enforceable.

 

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