Kiwi performer comes to Scottish Borders

If you were around in the 60s and 70s then Kiwi performer Tim Benton’s show ‘‘Songs of 1965-75: Scenes from a Well-spent Youth’, interpreting the music of Dusty Springfield, Bob Dylan, Gene Pitney, The Kinks will bring back many memories.

You can catch his show at Hermitage Hall, Hawick on Friday October 21, Oxton War Memorial Hall, Oxton on Friday October 28 and Chirnside Community Centre on Saturday October 29. All shows start at 7.30pm. Performances are supported by Creative Scotland and Live Borders, Borders LIVE Touring project.

Benton comments, “Those of a ‘certain age’ will enjoy exploring what these songs mean today, 40-50 years on.

“For example, the peace, love and hope promised by the Age of Aquarius and flower power back in 1967 seems innocent and poignant today. So does Bob Dylan’s The Times they Are a-Changing.

“Younger generations will enjoy discovering great ‘new’ songs from a particularly fertile era in popular music spanning the British Invasion, Motown, country rock, singer-songwriters and much more.”

A New Zealander, Tim Benton moved to London in 2007. He’s sung and acted in clubs, cabarets and theatres in Wellington, Sydney, Melbourne, Hawaii, London, around the UK and in Ireland.

In London, he played Sydney Carton in the new musical A Tale of Two Cities, dir. Paul Nicholas, Upstairs at the Gatehouse. Stage newspaper described him as “spot on” as the world-weary, alcoholic lawyer.

A review of Benton’s performance at a recent Camden Festival noted “…a truly lovely interpretation of Simon & Garfunkel’s America…. Another highlight is the stripped-back version of The Kinks’ Waterloo Sunset, which is stunning in its simplicity – Benton’s storytelling here is just right. Bob Dylan’s The Times They Are a Changin’… is a genuinely rousing, almost powerful interpretation of a classic work.”

Ewan Jackson, Live Borders’ Chief Executive commented: “We are proud to support rural touring through Borders Live Touring and are certain that Tim’s performances will appeal to a great cross-section of Borderers.”