John Muir’s birthplace gets a 3D digital makeover

Will Collins, John Muir Birthplace Trust; James Hepner, Historic Scotland; Lyn Wilson, Historic Scotland; Kate Maynard, East Lothian Council ' scanning the Dunbar castle and harbour.
Will Collins, John Muir Birthplace Trust; James Hepner, Historic Scotland; Lyn Wilson, Historic Scotland; Kate Maynard, East Lothian Council ' scanning the Dunbar castle and harbour.

People across the world will soon be able to visit the Dunbar birthplace of Scottish nature conservationist John Muir - on line,

The cutting edge 3D laser technology work, which provides a lasting digital image, is being carried out by heritage survey specialists from Historic Scotland and experts in 3D visualisation from CyArk.

It is part of a transatlantic project featuring Muir’s home in California and links to the 2013 Year of Natural Scotland, the 2014 Year of Homecoming and the centenary of John Muir’s death.

The same techniques that have created a digital archive for World Heritage sites such as Skara Brae on Orkney and landmarks such as Mt Rushmore and the Sydney Opera House, are being used. The detailed digital models, photographs and virtual 3D fly-through tour of Muir’s homes in Scotland and the US will be used for mobile and PC apps, connecting the Scottish and American stories of John Muir, the father of conservation.

Dr Lyn Wilson, digital survey manager at Historic Scotland, said: “We are able to create an exceptionally accurate digital model of the site to conserve it for the benefit of future generations to come.”

Will Collin, of the John Muir Birthplace Trust, said: “John’s love of nature was awakened here in Dunbar. This exciting project will make his boyhood home accessible across the whole world. We believe it will let folk see what first inspired the lad from Dunbar and helped make him nature’s foremost, and most eloquent, advocate.”