Grouse shooting benefits economy

12/08/02, GLORIOUS 12TH , DAWYCK ESTATE, PEEBLESHIRE,.  GUNDOG JAY AND GAMEKEEPER JAKE MCWATT WITH THE FIRST GROUSE OF THE NEW SEASON IS SHOT ON THE DAWYCK ESTATE.

12/08/02, GLORIOUS 12TH , DAWYCK ESTATE, PEEBLESHIRE,. GUNDOG JAY AND GAMEKEEPER JAKE MCWATT WITH THE FIRST GROUSE OF THE NEW SEASON IS SHOT ON THE DAWYCK ESTATE.

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As the 2014 grouse season has ended, the value of grouse shooting and the benefit it brings for the economy and the environment are highlighted in an infographic being sent to MPs by the British Association for Shooting and Conservation (BASC) and the Moorland Association.

The facts include: Heather moorland is rarer than rainforest and 75% of it is found in Britain because of grouse moor management; Grouse shooting in Scotland, England and Wales supports conservation work and is worth an estimated £100 million a year; Grouse shooting in Scotland, England and Wales supports the equivalent of more than 2,500 jobs; conservation for grouse shooting is landscape-scale management; 79% of upland EU Special Protection Areas are managed as grouse moors and up to five times more threatened wading birds are supported on moors managed by gamekeepers.

Richard Ali, BASC chief executive, said: “Grouse shooting delivers significant benefits to the economy, the environment and our tables.

“The conservation benefits for heather moorland, which has been described as “our rainforest”, are clear and it’s important that MPs are aware of these facts.”

Robert Benson, chairman of the Moorland Association, said: “Driven grouse shooting and associated moorland management is an essential part of managing, maintaining and protecting our rare upland habitats.

“Grouse shooting is a critical economic driver which provides economic benefits in rural areas.”