Fate of Civil War soldiers discussed at Dunbar event

Archaeologist Janet Beveridge from Durham University Archaeological services carrying out an excavation on a human burial site near Durham University's Palace Green library.
Archaeologist Janet Beveridge from Durham University Archaeological services carrying out an excavation on a human burial site near Durham University's Palace Green library.

A public engagement event led by the archaeological team who excavated and analysed the remains of medieval Scottish soldiers at Durham took place in Dunbar on St Andrew’s Day (Monday November 30).

The event at the Dunmuir Hotel was attended by representatives of East Lothian Council, Dunbar Community Council, the local history society and The Sealed Knot, amongst others.

The Durham University team announced in September that skeletons found in a mass grave at Durham’s UNESCO World Heritage Site were the remains of Scottish soldiers who fought at the 1650 Battle of Dunbar.

The event was held to gather views on what happens next to the soldiers’ remains, covering further research, reburial and commemoration.

The Durham University team, joined by Canon Rosalind Brown of Durham Cathedral, presented their research findings, and a lively question, answer and feedback followed.

Professor Chris Gerrard, Head of the Department of Archaeology, Durham University, said: “Dunbaris where this story began, almost 400 years ago. There has been such a great expression of interest in our project from the locality that we chose to hold our event here.

“We received a wonderful welcome and we appreciated being able to hear, at first hand, the views of a range of people on the next steps for the Scottish soldiers.”

The University team also held meetings with organisations and individuals with a special interest in the project. They will consider all views before making their decisions in 2016.

The mass grave of between 17 and 28 individuals were discovered by Durham University archaeologists in November 2013.