Autism expert strikes a chord with audience

Jim Taylor who has worked with families affected by autism for over 40 years, held the attention of his audience at the Meeting of Minds meeting at the Hirsel Golf Club, Coldstream.
Jim Taylor who has worked with families affected by autism for over 40 years, held the attention of his audience at the Meeting of Minds meeting at the Hirsel Golf Club, Coldstream.

The Meeting of Minds support group for families dealing with autism has proved to be invaluable in helping them with the day to day issues they face.

Their latest event at the Hirsel Golf Club last weekend proved just how influential this group is becoming when almost 100 people turned up to listen to autism expert Jim Taylor give an inspirational talk.

Jim was one of the first teachers in the UK to work exclusively with pupils with autism and was closely involved in the early pioneering work, in adapting educational thinking and teaching methods to the specific needs of children with autism. He received an award for Excellence in Education Leadership in 2015.

Chairman of Meeting of Minds, John Greenwell, said: “I was delighted that our latest event ‘Why Jim Taylor’ was such a huge success.

“We were initially expecting a turnout of 50 and eventually counted in 96 parents and professionals from education and social work to listen to a truly inspiring talk by Jim Taylor, someone who has worked with autism and its effects on family life for over 40 years.

“Everything he said rang a bell with someone present - whether parent or professional.”

Meeting of Minds founder Lauren Hamilton added: “Jim really cares about listening and observing the child/person and seeing what it is that makes them tick. “Autism is not about what the person can not do but tuning into what they can do! It is unique to every individual on the spectrum and Jim shared some great ideas and tools to help us all, highlighting that early intervention is key.

“The talk benefited us all and although it was centred around autism, it applied to others.

“It’s not about the diagnosis or the word autism, but the need for support for the person.”