Dunbar SciFest event receives top award

JON SAVAGE PHOTOGRAPHY'07762 580971'www.jonsavagephotogrtaphy.com'10th March 2012'****NO SALES****NO ARCHIVING'Eve Hexley from Dunbar investigates the properties of a human fingerprint and how evey persons print is unique''8 year old Flora Richards from Dunbar eses the effects of liquid nitrogen on biological matter, as the flowers petals shatter like glass after being immersed in the very cold liquid.'Dunbar SciFest Press Release''When: Saturday, 10th March (10am ' 5pm) and''Sunday 11th March 2011 (12-5pm)''The John Muir Campus of Dunbar Primary School, East Lothian''Where:''Parent Power creates a science extravaganza''Following the success of the very 1st Dunbar SciFest in 2011, which attracted over 2,000 visitors in just 5 hours, this East Lothian science festival celebrates is expansion into a weekend extravaganza with double the number of extraordinary science activities for all ages and interests and hopes to attract 4,000 visitors.' Over 80 parents have volunteered to ensure the smooth running of the D
JON SAVAGE PHOTOGRAPHY'07762 580971'www.jonsavagephotogrtaphy.com'10th March 2012'****NO SALES****NO ARCHIVING'Eve Hexley from Dunbar investigates the properties of a human fingerprint and how evey persons print is unique''8 year old Flora Richards from Dunbar eses the effects of liquid nitrogen on biological matter, as the flowers petals shatter like glass after being immersed in the very cold liquid.'Dunbar SciFest Press Release''When: Saturday, 10th March (10am ' 5pm) and''Sunday 11th March 2011 (12-5pm)''The John Muir Campus of Dunbar Primary School, East Lothian''Where:''Parent Power creates a science extravaganza''Following the success of the very 1st Dunbar SciFest in 2011, which attracted over 2,000 visitors in just 5 hours, this East Lothian science festival celebrates is expansion into a weekend extravaganza with double the number of extraordinary science activities for all ages and interests and hopes to attract 4,000 visitors.' Over 80 parents have volunteered to ensure the smooth running of the D

THE hugely successful Dunbar SciFest 2012 has been named the best science community event in the UK in an awards ceremony that aims to reward the passion of event and activity organisers during National Science and Engineering Week.

One of over 150 entries, the SciFest was recognised for its commitment to public engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths), and for its impact as a local community event. The organisers of Dunbar SciFest will receive prize money of £600, to be used for further STEM community engagement projects after British Science Association experts judged the SciFest the best science project in Britain.

The SciFest 2012 was organised by the science sub-group of Dunbar Primary School’s Parent Council. Now in its second year, 42 event providers delivered a range of science shows, workshops, demonstrations and talks, which attracted 3,500 visitors over 2½ days, including a high proportion from the Deaf Community as many of the events were BSL interpreted.

A vast range of activities featured at the festival, including; controlling a robokid robot, finding fossils, learning about seismology and making the earth quake, discovering Scottish cold water corals and killer whales, handling live crabs and starfish, flash freezing with liquid nitrogen, being crime scene chemists and finding out how planes fly, and whether the length of your fingers can predict sports performance.

Willie Rennie, leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats, attended the Festival and selected prize winners from the local community, who had successfully taken part in the Dunbar Molecule Hunt, in the run up to the event.

Sixteen local businesses featured specially made models of molecules relevant to the business, which participants tracked down, for a chance to be in the running for a prize.