Countdown to hangar unveiling at museum

An engineer installs a propellor on a 1942 Bristol Bolingbroke aircraft at the National Museum of Flight at East Fortune.
An engineer installs a propellor on a 1942 Bristol Bolingbroke aircraft at the National Museum of Flight at East Fortune.

Plans to complete the newly restored hangar at East Fortune’s National Museum of Flight by Easter are bang on schedule.

The attraction’s newly restored military aviation hangar, one of two Second World War hangars to undergo a £3.6m restoration and refurbishment will be unveiled on Good Friday, March 25.

As part of the new display the attraction’s 1942 Bristol Bolingbroke aircraft will be showcased and has been fitted with new propellers for the first time since just after the Second World War.

Built in 1940-41, the hangars are part of the East Fortune Airfield Scheduled Monument and on completion of their restoration will house an array of world-class military, leisure and commercial aircraft presented alongside interactives and film. The stories of those who piloted, worked on or flew in the aircraft will be told through thought-provoking interviews and displays with uniforms, documents and photographs.

The hangars will be insulated and heated using an environmentally friendly ground-source heating system. Funding for the redevelopment includes a £1.3m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund and £1.8m from the Scottish Government.

Bristol Bolingbrokes were used to train thousands of air gunners during the war as part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) and played a significant role in the RAF’s success during the conflict.