Component did not fall off operating turbine

Graeme Steel, a local Stow resident, has found a large piece of turbine blade from the Long Park wind farm on the minor road that runs from Stow towards Blainslie and Earlston. The piece is the length of his truck, and had hit the dyke alongside the road. This is a clear danger to the public.  The damaged turbine is fully visible as well.

Graeme Steel, a local Stow resident, has found a large piece of turbine blade from the Long Park wind farm on the minor road that runs from Stow towards Blainslie and Earlston. The piece is the length of his truck, and had hit the dyke alongside the road. This is a clear danger to the public. The damaged turbine is fully visible as well.

0
Have your say

The turbines at Longpark wind farm near Stow are turning again after being temporarily stopped when part of a turbine blade was found on the road side nearby.

The £33 million, 19 turbine Longpark wind farm is operated by EDF Energy Renewables who immediately shut down the turbines and started an investigation.

However, within 24 hours they had established that the component found next to the road had not fallen from any of the turbines but was in fact one of a number of being stored on the ground.

An EDF spokesperson said: “The component is a fibreglass spoiler which is normally attached to the turbine blades to improve their efficiency. They are not, however, integral to the turbines and the wind farm can operate normally without them.

“Work has been carried out at Longpark recently as part of a maintenance regime on these spoilers and a number of spoilers had been removed from turbines and were being stored at the site.

“An inspection carried out at the wind farm with turbine manufacturer Senvion, has shown that all of the spoilers which were not removed as part of the maintenance work are still in place on the relevant turbines.

“EDF Energy Renewables believes that it is unlikely that this spoiler, one of those being stored at ground level, could have found its way to the road side due to the wind and will continue to investigate how it could have been displaced.

“In the meantime the wind farm will resume normal operations.”

Following the incident, Borders MSP John Lamont has lodged a written question to the Scottish Government asking for a review of current rules regarding turbines being located close to public roads to product the public and road users.

He said: “Guidance already exists about how close turbines should be to public roads, but it is unclear and often ignored.

“This is why I’m calling on the Scottish Government to review the current rules with a view to ensuring that no new turbines are allowed to be closer to public roads than is safe and that existing turbines are not inappropriately located.”