Coldstream Museum’s role in promoting town

Last year the museum hosted a poetry and art exhibition by Julie and Arthur Parsons and John and Lyn Davidson.
Last year the museum hosted a poetry and art exhibition by Julie and Arthur Parsons and John and Lyn Davidson.

Coldstream’s branding is currently up for discussion - whether to focus on its links with the Coldstream Guards or its position as the only town situated on the border.

The town’s development trust is targeting the museum first and wants to hear residents’ views about increasing the space devoted to the Coldstream Guards; raising the profile of the link between town and regiment.

The museum is on the site where General Monck and his men left for London in 1660, and the Coldstream Guards are the only British regiment named after a town.

Scottish Borders Council currently operates Coldstream Museum and is one of the services that would transfer to the new cultural trust it is created.

“The museum service has agreed that an extension and upgrade of the existing guards exhibition in the Coldstream museum is desirable/possible but only through Coldstream’s support and through external grant-funding,” said Gerald Tait, of Coldstream Community Trust and chair of the trust’s development group.

Around 5000 people a year visit the museum and while Coldstream Community Council supports extending the Guards exhibition area, they don’t want it to be at the expense of the town history or touring exhibitions.

At a meeting in the museum last month the suggestion that the local history exhibition be moved to the storage area to expand the Guards exhibition was discussed but not agreed. Instead, Andrew Tulloch, SBC’s estate manager, suggested that the Guards exhibition could be extended by 25% without impacting on the local history exhibition.