Burrell Collection included artefact taken by Nazi regime

The 16th-century Swiss tapestry fragment entitled The Visitation
The 16th-century Swiss tapestry fragment entitled The Visitation

The former owner of Hutton Castle, William Burrell, bought a fragment of a 16th century Swiss tapestry in 1938 - an artefact that was part of an art collection taken from a family and sold by the Nazi regime in 1937.

William Burrell bought the piece of ‘The visitation’ tapestry, which was cut from the tapestry and fashioned into the shape of an ecclesiastical cope hood, from a third pary in 1938 and since then it has been part of his art collection which is now housed in its own museum in Glasgow. Now Glasgow City Council are looking at compensating the heirs of Emma Budge, from whom the Nazis took the tapestry fragment.

A spoliation advisory panel - a group of experts established by the Secretary of State to consider claims from families who lost possession of cultural objects during the Nazi era which are now in UK national collections - has now verified the claim. They have recommeded that: Glasgow City Council make an ex-gratia payment reflecting the current market value to the claimants in respect of the tapestry fragment; and that an explanation of its background is given when being displayed.