Borders leads way for onshore wind

The morning sun breaks through the mist to gleam down upon one of the forty metre tall turbines of the wind farm on the summit of Dun Law.
The morning sun breaks through the mist to gleam down upon one of the forty metre tall turbines of the wind farm on the summit of Dun Law.

Scotland gains over £7 billion of economic benefit from its local onshore wind industry, according to new figures released by RenewableUK.

Of that, benefits to the value of £249 million go directly into the local community as a result of installed onshore wind capacity in the area.

The figures reveal that Scotland is the leading country for onshore wind within the UK with just over 4,918 megawatts of onshore wind installed.

This capacity can power over 2.6 million homes. It will also lead to over £7 billion worth of economic benefit to the country over the lifetime of its wind energy projects.

This represents environmental benefits of 4.7 million tonnes of CO2 reduced per year due to onshore wind installed in Scotland alone.

The three largest areas for onshore wind in Scotland are the Highlands with 824MW installed, South Lanarkshire with 632MW installed, and the Scottish Borders with 564.59MW installed.

There are a number of firms active in the area ranging from independent onshore developers to component manufacturers and companies providing steels for wind turbines, including RES, SSE, ScottishPower Renewables, Natural Power and RJ McLeon.

The figures form part of a report, undertaken by BiGGAR Economics for RenewableUK, which shows that the economic benefits of developing onshore wind are strongly felt across the UK, with the onshore wind industry generating a total £906 million in gross value added (GVA) revenue to the UK economy in 2014 alone.

Since the beginning of 2012, GVA has risen by £358 million (up 65%) – revealing the increasing contribution that the onshore wind industry and its supply chain makes to the UK economy.