Little fox club is latest casualty

This little fox cub was very thin and after a check over at the vet was put on medication for an infection in its front leg.
This little fox cub was very thin and after a check over at the vet was put on medication for an infection in its front leg.

Thank you to everyone who came to our open day on Saturday. It was great that we had a wide selection of wildlife for everyone to see.

It was even possible to sneak a peep at our fox cub.

Thank you for all the help volunteers gave us to make the day a success and to those supporters who sent in beautiful cakes, craft goods and tombola prizes. Kay, Angela and myself were doing the teas and cakes in the office and we were so busy we didn’t get a chance to have a go on the tombola. The plant stall was very popular too.

Everyone seemed to enjoy the day. We made a total of £450.

We have had plenty of little herring gull chicks in over the last couple of weeks. As they are different sizes we have had to have two pens for them.

The primary school pen is for the smaller babies, the middle school is for the bigger ones. Once they start growing proper feathers they can stay outside in the little pond pen until they are able to fly, when they can be released.

We also have a mallard duck and her 12 ducklings.

The duck made her nest in a garden and the householder found it just as the eggs had hatched.

The lady had great presence of mind and dropped a clothes basket over the whole lot. It was then easy to get them all into a carrier.

We decided we should keep them in an aviary for just a few days as they were so newly hatched then they can be released on the river well away from the gulls.

Kay had a call last week about a fox cub that was crying at a farm entrance.

The poor little thing was very thin and after a check over at the vet was put on medication for an infection in its front leg. He had broken a bone which was almost healed but it had become infected.

He must have not been able to keep up with the rest of the family due to his sore leg.

The antibiotic was in pill form and the cub needed a dose morning and evening. No problem then! The cub has a chick which has the pill pushed in it every morning and the same at night and as long as he eats the chicks he gets extra food at night.

His cage is covered by a towel so it was simple for visitors on our open day were able to peep through the join of the towel screen and see him sleeping in his box.

Once he has had the seven day course of pills he will go into the big aviary for a few days to fatten up a bit before he goes back to the wild.

We are now collecting clean rags to raise money for the day to day expenses of the trust. We have bags for filling at the Rollo Centre so if you can help please call in and pick up some bags.

Our next open day will be Saturday, August 1, when we have our annual general meeting so if you missed this one you will have another chance to see what we are doing.

We shall then be officially performing the opening of the isolation room.