Fingers crossed that sight returns for tawny owl

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Last week I wrote about a very lucky Tawny Owl that escaped serious injury.

We have another Tawny Owl with us, thankfully not a red one so it is much more placid. This bird has been with us for a few weeks.

When it arrived it had concussion, sitting huddled with its head moving from side to side, indicating brain trauma. Fortunately the head moving stopped the next day.

The vet confirmed there was no fracture to the skull and the retinas were not displaced.

We left it food to see if it would feed by itself. It had not eaten the following day so we force fed it a mouse which it swallowed willingly.

It was still very placid, a bit too placid, when we examined it again we realised it was completely blind.

This happens when there is a bleed on the brain. It can take some time for the bleed to disperse and for the sight to return. It can take months.

We have had to feed it every day and there is no sign of any sight returning.

The vet had a look at him today and suggested we should not force feed him for the next 48 hours in the hope that he will try to find the food himself. I will report on the progress next time.

Our ‘Hole in the head’ young swan is making excellent progress. When the bird came in it had a cut on its head down to the bone. It was larger than a fifty pence piece and like a tonsure with the skull showing through.

Now it is the size of a tiny shirt button. It has had to be treated daily to clean it and take off the scabs so that ointment can be applied which encourages skin growth.

She is a good weight now and hates having the wound treated, but she has to be caught up each day and carried into the surgery to be treated.

We are sure she had stones thrown at her as she cowers when a lettuce is tossed into her pen.

We hope that just a couple more weeks should see the hole closed up. I think she will be as pleased as we shall be.

Hedgehogs keep coming in as fast as we release them. One that was brought in this week was a very hefty 1200grams but sadly was not speedy enough when crossing the road.

We took off over 50 ticks which were not helping her. She had a nasty cut from her mouth to her chin which the vet sutured and we are keeping her warm in the Vetario.

She is not recovering very well and is sleeping a lot but eating very little.

We can only give her a bit of time to recover from the shock.

At least being plump she can stand losing a bit of weight while she gets herself back to normal.

Our two very late hatch Mallard Ducklings are progressing very well.

They run from us when we go into the Lomax Aviary. Another two or three weeks should see their flight feathers grown in and then they can go and face the world.

More next week.